Books You Should Have Read

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'GROWN UP DIGITAL'
1. 'GROWN UP DIGITAL'
DON TAPSCOTT
Its alternate title could be "In Defense of the Net Generation." Tapscott's report on findings from a $4 million private research study indicate that children of baby boomers just might be more stimulated and their minds better activated by juggling Google searches and Facebook pages than by reading a book cover to cover.

'PLANET GOOGLE'
2. 'PLANET GOOGLE'
RANDALL STROSS
This New York Times columnist skips the tales of campus day care and free food to focus on Google's history of risk and experimentation. It's a compelling narrative about the little company that could, its dominance achieved with a mix of fast, inexpensive technology; strong market capitalization; and one broad mission: to organize the world's information.

'GROUNDSWELL'
3. 'GROUNDSWELL'
CHARLENE LI AND JOSH BERNOFF
Forrester analysts Li and Bernoff have prepared one of the most useful primers on the surge in social media. Practical advice on how to tap a following and make your social apps measurable keeps this book a step ahead of the pack. As a guide for your own groundswell, the authors offer the acronym POST: people, objective, strategy and technology.

'A HISTORY OF ADVERTISING'
4. 'A HISTORY OF ADVERTISING'
STÉPHANE PINCAS AND MARC LOISEAU
In 2006 members of Publicis Groupe drafted a timeline of famous ad campaigns in honor of the 100th birthday of Marcel Bleustein-Blanchet, Publicis' late founder. Now on commercial shelves via Taschen, the expanded edition offers more than 300 glossy pages of work documenting the dramatic leap of consumerism into the 21st century.

'THE WAY WE'LL BE'
5. 'THE WAY WE'LL BE'
JOHN ZOGBY
To say Zogby's future America is a utopia of complacency is barely an overstatement. But call it optimistic, and you'd be spot-on. The political pollster rounds up a bounty of research promising the return of social responsibility, a celebration of diversity and an eagerness among youth to pool resources for the bigger picture.

'THE BRAND BUBBLE'
6. 'THE BRAND BUBBLE'
JOHN GERZEMA AND ED LEBAR
Y&R's chief insights officer pulls back the curtain on the agency's massive BrandAsset Valuator, the largest brand database in the world. The authors predict sizeable corporate value loss for businesses touting brand valuations far greater than what they are worth to consumers. Grim times may be upon us. Sound familiar?

'HERE COMES EVERYBODY'
7. 'HERE COMES EVERYBODY'
CLAY SHIRKY
Shirky has a knack for setting the record straight on internet trends and origins. Here, he explains how social media, combined with our ability to assemble groups, has resulted in a communications network larger than ever deemed possible. When everyone's an expert (and, by default, an amateur) -- well, that certainly puts the title of influencer up for grabs.

'THE ADVENTURES OF JOHNNY BUNKO'
8. 'THE ADVENTURES OF JOHNNY BUNKO'
DANIEL H. PINK
Bonus-free holidays and New Year hiring freezes got you down? "Johnny Bunko" may be your great escape. Dan Pink's follow-up to "A Whole New Mind," his cry for creativity in a post-information age, is equally effective. This time he's chosen a more contemporary format for his message: a comic book in the style of Japanese manga.

9.	'WHY WORK SUCKS AND HOW TO FIX IT'
9. 'WHY WORK SUCKS AND HOW TO FIX IT'
CALI RESSLER AND JODY THOMPSON
"Why Work Sucks" tracks the growing opinion of the traditional 9-to-5 as passé and counterproductive. Taking readers step by step through the conditions of a Results-Only Work Environment, Ressler and Thompson put the spotlight on Best Buy as a favorite example of waste-no-time efficiency.

'OBSESSIVE BRANDING DISORDER'
10. 'OBSESSIVE BRANDING DISORDER'
LUCAS CONLEY
Conley's rant on brand desensitization borders on paranoid -- the words "rapid exploitation" appear throughout -- but his call to resist the urge to align our individual identities with brand identities challenges the momentum of today's brand ambassadors.

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