Nick Jr. Explores Chinese Version of Hit Show 'Dora'

'Kai-lan' Will Introduce Children to Mandarin Starting Early Next Year

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With the success of children's shows "Dora the Explorer" and "Go, Diego, Go," Nick Jr. has decided to introduce preschoolers to "Ni Hao, Kai-lan" early next year.
Ni Hao, Dolly? If 'Ni Hao, Kai-lan' captures kids' attention, it could expand into dolls, clothes, videos and other merchandise.
Ni Hao, Dolly? If 'Ni Hao, Kai-lan' captures kids' attention, it could expand into dolls, clothes, videos and other merchandise.

The animated show will follow Kai-lan Chow, a 5-year-old girl who speaks both English and Mandarin and goes on little adventures with her animal friends, including Rintoo, a rambunctious tiger, and Hoho, a three-year-old monkey. The series also explores the strong relationship between Kai-lan and her grandfather, Yeye.

"We're really excited about it," said Pam Kaufman, chief marketing officer, Nickelodeon, MTVN Kids & Family Group. "This is the first to show a Chinese-American intergenerational family."

The launch, originally set for this year, has been delayed several times and is now scheduled for February 2008, during Chinese New Year. The network is talking to at least one Asian-American ad agency about pushing "Ni Hao, Kai-lan" to advertisers.

Learning Mandarin
In the show, Kai-lan and her friends learn about traditions such as Chinese New Year and the traditional Dragon Boat Festival. Geared toward children ages 2 to 5, the show also will introduce kids to at least one Mandarin word per episode. In the series pilot, viewers are asked to help Hoho hop high enough to reach a dragon boat on top of a pagoda by yelling the word "tiao," which means "jump."

"The success of Dora went beyond just the cartoon," said an executive at an Asian-American agency. "There are videos, clothes, dolls and other toys, etc. Hopefully this new show will find the same success, and not just with Asian-Americans but with the general market, too. "

"We know kids want to see themselves on TV," Ms. Kaufman said, and about 60% of the 15.4 million Asian-Americans are of Chinese descent.
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