Power Players 2007: 21 - 25

Published on .

INDEX | 1 - 5 | 6 - 10 | 11 - 15 | 16 - 20 | 21 - 25 | 26 - 30
21 TONY
ZOOK
PRESIDENT-CEO
ASTRAZENECA U.S.
AD BUDGET:
$1.01 BILLION
AGENCIES INLCUDE:
  • Publicis' Leo Burnett Worldwide, Chicago; Medicus, Saatchi & Saatchi Consumer Healthcare and Zenith Media USA, N.Y.
  • Publicis-backed Bromley Communications, N.Y. and San Antonio
  • WPP's CommonHealth, Parsippany, N.J.
  • POWER PLAY:
    Tony Zook, who heads AstraZeneca's marketing globally, should think about finding an iconic mascot for heartburn medication Nexium -- something like the Energizer Bunny, because Nexium just keeps going and going and going. The little purple pill continues to be the No. 1 seller in the category and the No. 2 drug in the world behind Pfizer's Lipitor. As Mr. Zook continues to pilot cholesterol drug Crestor to strong sales, he and AstraZeneca also have found a niche with antipsychotic medication Seroquel.
    DOWNSIDE:
    As with many pharmas, it's less a case of "What have you done for me lately?" than "What will you do for me in the future?" No sooner is one blockbuster on the market than the industry is looking for the next. Unfortunately for AstraZeneca, the company's drug pipeline is considered one of the weaker ones in the industry. Even the stunning success of Seroquel, which wasn't on the market 10 years ago, comes with a caveat: Its patent expires in 2011.
    22 MICH
    MATHEWS
    SENIOR VP-CENTRAL MARKETING GROUP
    MICROSOFT CORP.
    AD BUDGET:
    $912.2 MILLION
    AGENCIES INLCUDE:
  • Interpublic's McCann Worldgroup, San Francisco; Universal McCann, N.Y.
  • Omnicom's GMR Marketing, New Berlin, Wis.
  • WPP's VML, Seattle; Y&R, N.Y.
  • POWER PLAY:
    In a word: Vista. The estimated $500 million launch of the next-generation operating system from Microsoft may not have been groundbreaking, but the mass of the marketing campaign was unparalleled. Mich Mathews, 40, oversaw the effort, which included user-generated-content solicitations and extensive retail events, parties and promotions. Vista and the companion Windows Office software campaign relied heavily on digital elements, a key strategic shift Ms. Mathews has said eventually will account for the majority of Microsoft's marketing budget. Xbox got a boost from the poor reception for Sony's PlayStation 3.
    DOWNSIDE:
    The Vista campaign didn't spark widespread consumer interest or sales and, in fact, garnered its share of criticism for overspending and underdelivering. Analysts believe most consumers will upgrade simply when it's pre-installed on their next computer. Ditto for Office. Xbox still is being outsold by Nintendo's Wii, and MP3 player Zune's "social" marketing idea didn't pan out either.
    23 GARY
    ELLIOTT
    VP-CORPORATE AND BRAND MARKETING
    HEWLETT-PACKARD CO.
    AD BUDGET:
    $828.8 MILLION
    AGENCIES INLCUDE:
  • Interpublic's DraftFCB, McCann Erickson and ID Media, N.Y.
  • Omnicom's Agency.com, Chicago; Goodby, Silverstein & Partners, San Francisco
  • Publicis' Publicis, Seattle and San Francisco; ZenithOptimedia, San Francisco
  • POWER PLAY:
    "The computer is personal again" PC effort continued to draw on celebrity talent, stretching its "Hands" online and offline campaign to include designer Vera Wang and tennis star Serena Williams. Printing and imaging began a $300 million effort for its Print 2.0 strategy, fronted by longtime spokes-celeb Gwen Stefani. HP veteran Gary Elliott, 56, has carried the marketing torch during two chief-marketing-officer departures in the past two years and has helped guide the overall marketing effort that this year enabled HP to vault ahead of Dell in U.S. computer sales.
    DOWNSIDE:
    HP recently appointed a former Disney executive, Michael Mendenhall, its new CMO, replacing Mr. Elliott's former boss, Cathy Lyons. New top execs usually mean changes, and though current marketing is strong, tweaks are likely. HP will need to keep refreshing its marketing and push more product innovation to keep in front of Dell, which has come out swinging recently with new products and marketing.
    24 ROBERT
    DOTSON
    CEO
    T-MOBILE USA
    AD BUDGET:
    $815.1 MILLION
    AGENCIES INLCUDE:
  • Publicis' Publicis West, Seattle; Conill, Torrance, Calif.; Optimedia International U.S., N.Y.
  • POWER PLAY:
    Robert Dotson, 47, who took over marketing duties after the exit of Chief Marketing Officer Mike Butler early this year, has achieved a modicum of success with the MyFaves campaign. The plan allows unlimited calls to five friends regardless of their carriers. Of T-Mobile's 27 million subscribers, about 2.5 million, or 9%, are MyFaves customers. Although it's the No. 4 carrier, T-Mobile keeps up with the pack via good prices for service ranked No. 1 by J.D. Power & Associates. Despite its limited phones and lack of fancy mobile-TV and music offerings, T-Mobile continues to be a leading growth engine for its parent, Deutsche Telekom.
    DOWNSIDE:
    T-Mobile has been biding its time until next year, when its parent will pump enough money into infrastructure to launch a new high-speed network that will allow the telecom to better compete with the hip TV and music offerings of other carriers. As the new offerings emerge, Mr. Dotson might use the MyFaves sub-brand to expand social-networking services. T-Mobile has built a strong Wi-Fi business in partnership with Starbucks, but that will be challenged as WiMax rolls out.
    25 TED
    WARD
    VP-MARKETING
    GEICO CORP.
    AD BUDGET:
    $499.5 MILLION
    AGENCIES INLCUDE:
  • Interpublic's Martin Agency, Richmond, Va.
  • POWER PLAY:
    Geico's gecko and cavemen have revolutionized the once-sleepy insurance segment and pushed spending to nosebleed levels, topping out at $1.4 billion (Geico accounted for nearly a third of it last year). Ted Ward, 56, has helped power the once-unknown player to No. 4. Geico could soon surpass Progressive to grab the No. 3 spot by market share among auto insurers. State Farm won't lose its crown anytime soon, but Mr. Ward deserves credit for forcing changes at the No. 1 auto insurer. It takes a certain kind of blind faith in marketing to up spending as dramatically as Geico has in the past few years.
    DOWNSIDE:
    How much spending is too much? Could the outlandish outlays by the top players -- which already have plunged the segment into a cutthroat price war -- get worse? When does the increased spending simply stop producing better business results? And will there ever be a day when Geico can slow down spending and still get the same results? The evolution of Geico's cavemen into a prime-time sitcom on ABC (which made its debut last week) seemed like a coup, but there's always the risk of overexposing the iconic brand image. And with Martin digesting the Wal-Mart Stores account, could Geico end up a side dish?
    INDEX | 1 - 5 | 6 - 10 | 11 - 15 | 16 - 20 | 21 - 25 | 26 - 30
    In this article:
    Most Popular