Non-TV Efforts Creativity Loved

Plus Creativity's Favorite Spots

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Discovery Channel and interactive innovator Area/Code brought armchair marine biologists a step closer to dangerous sharks in this execution that wrapped real-time shark-position data with a research-based game and SMS and e-mail notifications. The cable channel was rewarded with exciting game experiences evangelized to thousands by a hard-core group of Shark Runners.
Remember the Pete and Re-Pete joke? (Pete and Re-Pete went into a boat. Pete fell out. Who was left? Re-Pete! Pete and Re-Pete ...) That's the essential principal behind one of the more entertaining, if mindless, sites we ran into this year. In a freedom-to-talk push, Poke, London created a never-ending webpage. Really, it doesn't stop.
Employing the creative finesse of McCann's T.A.G., the digital efforts of AKQA and the technical prowess of Stan Winston and New Deal Studios, the campaign centered on a battle-scene diorama that stoked the mythology around the Xbox game's Master Chief. Web films supported the diorama's narrative, with the site itself offering a tour through the Stan Winston/New Deal-built set piece.
After unprecedented hype this past summer, iPod's cousin sold more than 500,000 units in its July opening weekend. By combining cultural cachet with its tech wizardry, Apple's phone foray has set a new standard for a well-designed interface with practical, user-friendly technology in the mobile arena. And this is still just the first generation.
The multiple agencies pushing "The Simpsons Movie" cornered virtually all spaces including outdoor, digital and TV. With Crispin Porter & Bogusky's cross-promo Burger King effort, the sci-fi "Simpsonize Me" TV spots and the web-based avatar creator of the same name, as well as Tracey Locke's 7-11 takeover, audiences were treated to a heavy dose of Homer and Co.
As part of its new "Never Hide" campaign to inject a much-needed youthful edge into the Ray-Ban brand, Cutwater created a video that chronicles two friends showing their shade-tossing abilities in various barely believable forms. Besides sparking much "How'd they do that?" debate online, the clip garnered 3.1 million YouTube views.
Leveraging the Bruce Campbell-starring TV campaign for the web audience, Wieden & Kennedy, Portland, Ore., and digital agency Domani Studios' "Experience Old Spice" site touted a comprehensive 50-question Experience Test to separate the men from the boys. Experience Training tutorials were offered on everything from football defense to shaking hands like a Siberian.
'GET THE GLASS' Goodby, Silverstein and Partners' campaign for California Milk Processors Board launched with a series of cinematic spots featuring the Adachi family of hoodlums in hot pursuit of a glass of milk, drawing viewers to even more fun at The online board game enlists visitors to tackle challenges to help lead the calcium-deprived clan to their booty.
Born of a dare by Esquire Editor in Chief David Granger to David Droga, the Tap Project made NYC tap water both sexy and meaningful. Promoting World Water Day on March 22, Droga 5 branded basic tap water, encouraging diners to pay $1 for the typically free water at participating New York restaurants, with proceeds going to UNICEF's clean-water initiatives around the globe.
Uniqlock will draw you into one of the best-articulated and most pleasant aesthetics on the web this year. A creative lead on the project, Koichiro Tanaka of Projector, said, "The challenge was to design the best fusion of dance and sound as a clock; the point was that the clock should be everlasting, ever-changing media."

Creativity's Favorite Spots

By Teressa Iezzi
TBWA/Chiat/Day, New York
The story here isn't new: a melancholy Midas reveals the downside to having all the world turn gold in his hands. But everything about this spot (which creatives say ran only online), makes an argument for the 30- and 60-second formats.
TBWA/Chiat/Day, New York
A dandy, dancing lad sings a merry berries-and-cream song and takes candy advertising to a place where perhaps it shouldn't go, but we're glad it did.
Wieden & Kennedy, Portland, Ore.
Chargers linebacker Shawne Merriman and Rams running back Steven Jackson travel across a field and across time. Merriman falls and takes a second longer than he should to get up; that moment is better than most ads you've seen this year.
Fallon, London
To critics who would ask what a drumming gorilla has to do with selling a chocolate bar, a question in return: Why not? The point of chocolate is to alter your brain chemistry, so it makes perfect sense Fallon would offer up sights and sounds that provoke such deeply rooted sensations.
Fallon, London
Thousands of brightly hued bunnies take over lower Manhattan and transform into a crashing wave, a breaching whale and the mother of all rabbits. Director Frank Budgen ensured Bravia can still claim advertising like no other.
McCann/T.A.G., San Francisco
"Believe" is based around a diorama depicting a "historic" battle within the game. It's a daring approach that elevates what is essentially a shooting game.
An interviewer is distracted by a coffee stain on a prospective employee's shirt. That stain happens to be spouting gibberish over its host's words. It's always nice when a brand like Tide backs an effort that isn't forgettable.
Droga 5, New York
The prepaid mobile provider called cell companies what everyone knows they really are: evil. In spots, your "typical" cell company hates dogs and screws over grandmothers. Theme: If they routinely bilk good folk like Grandma, imagine what they think of you.
Saatchi & Saatchi, Los Angeles
The massively multiplayer role-playing game "World of Warcraft" was among the inspirations for this spot, which follows the Saatchi recipe of showing Toyota trucks surviving ridiculously perilous situations and adds a pop-culture twist.
Fallon, London
A crack team of bakers joyfully, yet with due solemnity, conjures an entire Fabia out of sugar and flour and candied fruit and all manner of yummy matter. The end result is the kind of sweet entertainment Fallon has a knack for producing.
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