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Rate the Ad: Kraft: Corporate Logo

Published on . 18

Last week, we examined MTV "Use a Condom" ads that took shape as old-timey porno stills. From Sao Paulo agency Loducca, the ads urge contraceptive use with sepia images of an adventurous threesome with the tagline "Except for AIDS, nothing has changed" over the frolickers' unmentionables. We wanted to know if porno is still porno in sepia, and if anyone was racing to cover Brazilian kids' eyes.

One commenter is worried about those impressionable eyes: "dporridge" says "This is absolutely unacceptable. And, yes, society has a responsibility toward the well-being of children and youth. Sadly, other than force-feeding kids merchandise to nag their parents to buy, advertisers have little care for the youngest component of the population."

As for the question of sepia candy-coating nudity, "not_a_toy" firmly quashes all hopes of slipping bawdiness in with time-worn tones: "Porno is always porno, doesn't matter if it's watercolor, oil painting, black and white, or this sepia. Only thing this campaign educates me is that there was porno even back in silent film era. Wow, really?"

This week, we look to a new logo from packaged foods giant Kraft. The new corporate logo, the first to diverge from that on food, is meant to signal a new direction for the company and will only appear on corporate communications and Kraft's website. That means the logo won't appear on your favorite Kraft salad dressing; the old, red, white and blue logo will remain on company-branded foods. Via Ad Age, the smiling multi-color mark, with the tagline "Make today delicious," was created with London-based agency Nitro and another shop Promise with input from consumers and employees. So we want to know, if most consumers won't even see the new logo, what's all the bother? Does it look like any other smiley logos you've seen lately? Is there an emerging corporate affinity for the star-burst? What's the purpose of breaking off the corporate look from what consumers see on their food packaging? Share your thoughts, below.
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