Six Things You Didn't Know About Young & Laramore's Carolyn Hadlock

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Carolyn Hadlock
Carolyn Hadlock

Deciding early on between art direction and nursing, Carolyn Hadlock chose the X-Acto blade over the hypodermic syringe. Now, as the principal and executive creative director of Young & Laramore, she leads creative work for clients ranging from Schlage locks to Procter & Gamble to Goodwill Industries. But there's more to Ms. Hadlock than the ad business, as she reveals in this week's installment of "Six Things."

1. She detassled corn when she was 14. The foreman was a woman who kept forgetting her name and calling her "blue shirt." When Ms. Hadlock asked the foreman for her name, it turned out to be Carolyn as well. "She still called me blue shirt after I told her that if she could remember her name, she could remember mine."

2. She's a ham sandwich snob. Ms. Hadlock claims she could tell you the best place to get a ham sandwich in any major city. For the non-believers out there, some proof: In Indianapolis, Ms. Hadlock recommends Keystone Deli, where the ham comes warm, thick and stacked high. In Chicago, go to Hannah's Bretzel on Monroe Street; in Savannah, Ga., it's Goose Feathers Cafe; and in Richmond, Va., you need to get to Richmond on Broad Cafe.

3. She got cut from art/design school when she was 19. "I was told I had no talent and that I was wasting my parent's money by the head of the school. I had to start over at another art school. I was a freshman when I should have been a senior. I'm the only person I know who has a seven-year undergraduate degree. My parents are saints."

4. She has yet to be beaten at Jenga. She welcomes all takers.

5. She understands the value of "artistic expression." As a mother of two, Carolyn has set some unconventional household rules. "I let my kids cuss at home," she said, "because when done right, it's an art form."

6. If she ever again considered another career, it would be marine biology. Ms. Hadlock's first taste of life underwater came at the age of three, when she was thrown off a diving board into the deep end of a pool despite not knowing how to swim. It didn't scar her too badly, though: Today she still likes to spend her time scuba diving 100 feet below the surface.

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