UPFRONT;MINI-REVIEW

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The New York office of M&C Saatchi's debut print campaign for British Airways business class: some assembly required.

David Garzotto/CopywriterCole Henderson Drake, Atlanta Quick! Somebody land the plane before it's time for his 6 o'clock breast feeding. Admittedly, working on an airline account isn't a great creative opportunity, but much better work has been done for the category.

The visuals in the campaign are totally contrived. I get them, but putting somebody's head on someone else's body just isn't that funny to me. I'm sure a lot of 6 year olds would get a kick out of this, though I doubt many of them fly British Airways business class.

Steve Skibba/Creative Director Freelance, New York This campaign sucks and blows at the same time, with dull, flat art direction and cutesy photography (the teddy bear and the puppy). Many of the shots look like they're straight out of a stock book. The "headlines," such as they are, employ the now all too common formula of stating the thing being advertised directly by name, then following it up with a "clever rejoinder," such as "lullaby not included." In this case, the clever rejoinders aren't clever or funny.

However, I'm glad to see that they're trying to convey the feeling of the new amenities, which, had it been done right, could have been powerful. At least they're ads for a real client.

Kathy Hepinstall/CopywriterFreelance, Los Angeles Overall, these ads do a good job in solving the dilemma of how to show airline comfort in a nontypical fashion, although it's hard to say whether we're supposed to see the airline customer as a child or a bird. The visuals are interesting and arresting, but the trite headlines only take the edge off the idea.

Forrest Healy/Copywriter Bozell/Salvati Montgomery Sakoda, Costa Mesa, Calif. There's something nice about the idea that an airline's plush accommodations can take you to a carefree, childlike state, but I liked this peek into the inner child, picture-in-picture idea better when Leonard/Monahan did it for Keds. Also, some of these visuals give me the creeps. The older man nestled against the woman's bosom. Yuk. The bird with a man's head. Is this profoundly symbolic

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