Ford Disassembles Car, Assembles Orchestra

Composition with 31 Auto-Part Instruments Debuts in Europe

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We're having a hard time not geeking out over this concept: Ford and Ogilvy hired two composers to disassemble a Focus and make 31 musical instruments out of it for a TV ad (full video after jump). The tagline: "The new Ford Focus. Beautifully arranged."

The five-door hatchback was hot off the line when film composer Craig Richey and New York sound designer Bill Milbrodt ripped it apart to create things like a Transmission Case Cello-Dulcimer, Rear Suspension Spike Fiddle and, cheekily, a Fender Bass. Doubt the guitar company would think that was so cute, but we obviously do.
This is a 'Fender Bass.'
This is a 'Fender Bass.' Credit: Ford

The composition, "Ode to a Ford" is hard for us to categorize, but resembles a waltzing classical dance tune from somewhere in, let's say, Eastern Europe. Some have compared it to Yann Tiersen, who's most famous for the Amelie soundtrack, but he's mostly a stand-in for Americans like ourselves unfamiliar with European folk music.

According to The Guardian, the commercial is part of a £45 million campaign that broke last night across 25 European markets. Mark Ovenden, the marketing director at Ford of Britain, told them, "We want to portray a message beyond showing a car driving along a piece of road. Like a great piece of music, the Ford Focus is more than the sum of its parts."

And what parts. I'm sure that the Door Harp is not acoustically sound, but look how beautiful they made these instruments are. They're so beautiful that Brit reality TV contest winner Alesha Dixon is using them and the car in a video/ad for her song "For You I Will."

Some have expressed doubts about how honest this video really is, with one commenter on proclaiming "a CELLO CAN NOT BE PLAYED BY A WASHER BLADE." Songs for Soap isn't sure what to believe, but let's not forget that one of the first electric guitars was made from a fence post. And don't forget how well the Australian Victoria Bitter beer ad turned out, and those were just bottles.

[Via The Guardian]