Chuck Anderson/No Pattern

Published on .

Most Popular

He's not even old enough to drink, but 19-year-old Chuck Anderson can already design some of the best under the drafting table. With no formal education, the Chicago-based freelance designer/illustrator has emerged as one of the print scene's most exciting talents, having created compelling eye candy for a slew of underground and mainstream mags, as well as not so shabby corporate clientele like Absolut and McDonalds. With no formal training, Anderson's brushstrokes move freely between design and illustration, his style never taking a categorizable root. "Very unplanned, inconsistent, changing rapidly, spur-of-the-moment and unintentional," is how he explains his approach-hence, his outfit's shingle NoPattern. "The name fits me for a reason," Anderson explains. "I like to think that being this way allows me to develop and progress in a way that a lot of people just can't. I have yet to create a style for myself that people expect me to stick with. I know it's cliche for me to say I don't like getting wrapped up in labels, but I don't like getting wrapped up in labels." As for what exactly it is he does do, "ultimately, who cares what it is called?" he says. "If it looks good, you can call it a load of steaming horse shit. Doesn't change the way it looks or the purpose it serves. The difference is meaningless. If you're good at what you do, you're good at what you do, no matter what you call it. I love making appealing end results, that is my goal." Citing inspirations like family, designer friends like Jason Bass of JB Shoes and David Gensler, the Audi TT and even the man above, Anderson's portfolio is marked by its strong colors and composition, displayed in everything from bold graphics, to multimedia collage. And what's next is just about as unpredictable as the last gig. "I don't want to ever do the same project twice. They can look the same, but if I haven't toyed with a new technique, what did I learn? How did I grow? Progression is the single most important part of any artist or person, focusing on what is next."

In this article: