Cannes 2010

More Global Creatives Comment on Cannes

Nick Watanabe, Anders Gustafsson, Andy Fackrell, Rebecca Carrasco, Miguel Calderon Discuss Their Favorites at This Year's Festival

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NICK WATANABE

EXECUTIVE CREATIVE STRATEGIST, NAKED COMMUNICATIONS, TOKYO

Ad Age: What campaign is likely to do well at Cannes?

Mr. Watanabe: I think Nike Chalkbot by Wieden & Kennedy will have the biggest chance in winning multiple awards and maybe a Grand Prix.

Ad Age: What's the best use of social media you've seen?

Mr. Watanabe: IKEA Facebook showroom by Swedish agency Forsman & Bodenfors.

Ad Age: What would you like to see less -- or none -- of?

Mr. Watanabe: Fake works created just to win awards.

Ad Age: What was the most exciting work you saw from your region?

Mr. Watanabe: Levi's ISpy twitter campaign from Australia.

Ad Age: What's your biggest challenge?

Mr. Watanabe: Low budget and global restrictions. More and more global clients based in the U.S. and Europe are centralizing their productions, normally handling from their headquarters. The offices around the world are asked to do the adaptation work efficiently. And obviously the local initiatives are decreasing dramatically.

ANDERS GUSTAFSSON

CREATIVE DIRECTOR, CRISPIN, PORTER & BOGUSKY EUROPE, LONDON

Ad Age: What campaign is likely to do well at Cannes?

Mr. Gustafsson: Gatorade Replay. Brilliant work in branded content and a convincing display from Chiat Day, showing that the agency is up to date with the new kind of storytelling. Relevant and just oozing with heart and soul. I love that campaign.

Ad Age: What's the best use of social media you've seen?

Mr. Gustafsson: Hard one. The Boone and Oakley site is liberating in the way they just let go of their brand and threw it out there. Being on YouTube sure makes it easy to show a lot of videos too. Smart and gutsy, I like it.

Ad Age: Which region or country most impresses you right now?

Mr. Gustafsson: I'm very impressed and proud that little Sweden is still in the international game. We're making the move from interactive rockstars to integrated geniuses on a large scale and you're not gonna get rid of us!

Ad Age: What would you like to see less -- or none -- of?

Mr. Gustafsson: Less over-produced, tiring, boring, irrelevant case movies please. Seeing "how quickly and successfully it spread in social media, via bloggers and on Facebook" is not impressive anymore, it's a necessity! Why is this relevant? What does it do for the brand?

Ad Age: What was the most exciting work you saw from your region?

Mr. Gustafsson: Nokia Signpost. Farfar went out in style and they will always be remembered as the greatest and most groundbreaking digital agency in the history of Scandinavia. Rest in peace.

Ad Age: What's your biggest challenge?

Mr. Gustafsson: Regardless if you're from interactive or traditional -- the biggest challenge for the whole industry has been to make the unavoidable step in to fully integrated campaigns. With great storytelling, relevant interactive strength and a fresh approach combined.

ANDY FACKRELL

CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER, 180 AMSTERDAM

Ad Age: What campaign do you think is likely to do well at Cannes?

Mr. Fackrell: A campaign for a bank out of Belgium. It was a very small buy. Had rock bands performing in website banner-shaped boxes. It was just really a really good "Eternal Sunshine"-like idea. It was harmless and fun. I think the trend in much of the good work across the board has been simplicity. Visual ideas and storytelling always works at Cannes.

Ad Age: What would you like to see less -- or none -- of?

Mr. Fackrell: Making of's. Who gives a?

Ad Age: What was the most exciting work you saw from your country?

Mr. Fackrell: A slightly extravagant football ad from an agency just up the canal from us [a reference to Nike's "Write the Future" spot by Wieden & Kennedy, Amsterdam].

Ad Age: What's your biggest challenge?

Mr. Fackrell: What clients are taking any risks out there? I mean caution rules. Pitches [are] being won on mood videos.

REBECCA CARRASCO

CREATIVE DIRECTOR, PUBLICIS MOJO, AUCKLAND

Ad Age: What campaign is likely to do well at Cannes?

Ms. Carrasco: Gatorade Replay. Retraining old high school sports teams to replay matches [from] the 1980s (right down to the coaches and cheerleaders) makes for a great story. It's a bloody smart way to create an audience around the brand, while also tapping into a new section of the market.

Ad Age: What's the best use of social media you've seen?

Ms. Carrasco: Nike Chalkbot. Social media is the new kid on the block. Which means it ends up at all the parties, but sometimes is left standing in the corner holding a glass of punch. This however...links a brave sportsman who does the ride of his life to give hope to cancer sufferers, with cancer sufferers who give him every reason to keep riding by literally placing their messages of hope and thanks along the path in front of him. Huge idea.

Ad Age: Which region or country impresses you?

Ms. Carrasco: America. It has always been known for great work, but the kind of work is changing. Hyundai Assurance is a brilliant recent example of this. Instead of doing an ad, they addressed the problem of people not buying cars due to financial uncertainty, with an idea that assured the public that if they lost their job during the GFC they could give the car back. Nike Chalkbot, Boone Oakley website, Whopper Sacrifice, and Millionaire are other examples of ideas that don't just rely on big budgets, but on big thinking.

MIGUEL CALDERON

FOUNDER AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR, GRUPO W, MEXICO
(Mr. Calderon responded in Spanish; a translation follows his answers)

Ad Age: What campaign is likely to do well at Cannes?

Mr. Calderon: Creo que la campaña de Livestrong, incluyendo Nike Chalkbot, de W+K, es fantástica. Usa el viaje entre plataformas de una forma muy inteligente para una problemática tan compleja como es la lucha contra el cáncer.

I think the Livestrong campaign, including Nike Chalkbot by Wieden & Kennedy, is fantastic. It uses the journey between platforms in a very intelligent way for something as complex as the fight against cancer.

Ad Age: What's the best use of social media you've seen?

Mr. Calderon: Puntualmente, Ikea's Showroom de Forsman & Bodenfors es una gran idea. Pero si pensamos en ideas que tengan una mayor vigencia de tiempo mayor, Best Buy's Twelpforce de Crispin Porter & Bogusky creo que es una plataforma maravillosa, una réplica digital y 24/7 de la esencia de Best Buy, social media usado como una herramienta más, y no como una moda.

Ikea's Showroom by Forsman & Bodenfors is really a great idea. But if we think of truly enduring ideas, I believe Best Buy's Twelpforce by Crispin Porter is a marvellous platform, and a digital, 24/7 replica of the essence of Best Buy. It's social media used as another tool, and not as a trend.

Ad Age: What was the most exciting work you saw from your region?

Mr. Calderon: Probablemente el proyecto de Black Pixel de Almap/ BBDO (Brasil), un plugin que instalas en tu computadora y que apaga un pixel de la pantalla para ahorrar energía. Me parece muy interesante porque habla de cómo una pequeña acción (digital en este caso) puede finalmente desembocar en un cambio importante.

Probably the Black Pixel project from Almap/BBDO (Brazil), a plug-in that you install in your computer and it turns off a pixel from the screen to save energy. It's very interesting because it talks about how even a small action, in this case a digital one, can eventually lead to an important change.

Ad Age: What's your biggest challenge?

Mr. Calderon: En esta región aún está muy extendida la costumbre de que la publicidad ha de ser disruptiva, aun cuando la gente ya no quiere que la interrumpan, así que estamos en la transición a que se convierta en productiva, lo cual es probablemente interesante para la audiencia pero no tanto para las marcas y muchas agencias, que de repente se ven fuera de su "zona-de-comfort."

In this region, there's still a widespread custom that advertising has to be disruptive, even when people no longer want to be interrupted. So we're in a transition to something more productive, which is probably interesting for the audience although not so much for the brands and for many agencies, who will suddenly find themselves outside of their comfort zones.