Media Mavens

Media Mavens: Julie Eddleman, P&G

A 'Scarcity Mentality' and Shopper Marketing Background Help Keep Exec Achieving Win-Win Scenarios

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Julie Eddleman came to her post in Procter & Gamble Co.'s top North American media job last year after overseeing such things as shopper marketing and branded content. And she's certainly aware of how digital media is reshaping everything.

Julie Eddleman, P&G
Julie Eddleman, P&G

But she also hasn't lost sight of the fact that P&G still uses a lot of TV and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future, which means cost pressures even for the biggest advertiser of all.

"We still spend the majority of our money on TV, and that 's a supply-demand marketplace," she said. "As long as people are willing to spend money there, I think our challenges will still remain in an inflationary marketplace" where media costs keep outstripping the growth of P&G and other CPGs.

"Unless there is a dramatic drop in the market," she added.

So to get the best deal for P&G, she approaches her job like she's working with a smaller media budget, a "scarcity mentality," as she puts it. And Ms. Eddleman, 41, draws a lot on her experience working in shopper marketing over the six years prior to her current post, working directly with just about every retailer except for the big three of Walmart, Target and Costco.

"We never go to one of our retailers unless we can find a way to get a win-win, where we can grow our business and they can grow their business and category," Ms. Eddleman said. "I tried to bring that mindset and mentality to everything we do from a media and marketing perspective."

Bringing divergent sides together has long been part of the job for Ms. Eddleman. She was a point person in integrating the Gillette and P&G marketing organizations as part of P&G's massive 2005 acquisition, its biggest ever. In that effort, she helped adapt Gillette's highly regarded "pay for performance" for shopper and trade marketing system to P&G, then spent the next five years putting the new system into action.

More broadly, she envisions a media environment that combines the integration of messages "across screens" with maximizing relevance by making sure consumers only get messages that are relevant to them. It's a tall order, even given improving analytical tools, but the goal is , well, win-win-"a better experience for the consumer and no wasted impressions for us."

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