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Super Bowl

Chrysler to Run Two-Minute Ad in Super Bowl

Extra-Long Ad Possibly a First, Certainly Costs a Fortune

By Published on . 2

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) -- In what may be a first for Super Bowl advertising, Chrysler intends to run a commercial approximately two minutes long, taking over an entire commercial break in the process.

Chrysler executives disclosed the plan earlier today at a J.D. Power automotive round table in San Francisco, according to a report from Automotive News and confirmed by others familiar with the situation.

Chrysler had to gain approval from the National Football League for the ad, because most Super Bowl ad breaks last just a minute and a half. The NFL maintains tight control over the number of national ads that air during its flagship event each year.

The super-size Super Bowl ad should help Chrysler stand out among a bevy of car ads in this year's game. No fewer than nine different automobile brands -- among them Audi, Kia, Chevrolet, Volkswagen and Mercedes-Benz -- will be appearing. The glut of auto ads may have viewers rubbing their eyes and trying to differentiate between the various commercials, particularly because mainstream car ads tend to use similar "show-the-metal" themes involving shots of vehicles wending down highways and city streets.

In addition to the striking length of its spot, however, Chrysler also has Eminem to help get attention. Its two-minute commercial will feature Eminem's song "Lose Yourself," the Detroit Free Press reported.

Then again, Eminem is already slated to appear during the Super Bowl in a claymation-themed ad for Lipton Brisk Iced Tea.

At two minutes in length, Chrysler's Super Bowl commercial may be the most expensive on the ad roster. A 30-second berth in this year's contest has been going for between $2.8 million and $3 million. Fox, which is broadcasting the game this Sunday, said it had sold out of ad inventory in late October, though some swapping of ad spots has taken place since that time.

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