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The Book of Tens 2010

Book of Tens: People We'll Miss

Published on .

Guy Day, 77
Guy Day
Guy Day
Guy Day, who in 1968 merged the agency he was then running, Faust/Day, with Jay Chiat & Associates to create Chiat/Day, was known as the cool, collected counterpoint to Mr. Chiat. "Guy made me sane while Jay made me crazy," said longtime chief Lee Clow. With Mr. Day as president, the agency created groundbreaking work such as Apple's "1984" Super Bowl ad and the iconic Absolut bottle campaign. Mr. Day retired from the agency in 1986 and later led new business for Los Angeles-based Keye/Donna/Pearlstein.

Ross Love, 64

Ross Love
Ross Love
A longtime Procter & Gamble vet, Ross Love was the first African-American to serve in the post of VP-advertising at the company. He held the position from 1987 until 1996, when he left to run his burgeoning urban-radio network. As former chairman of the Association of National Advertising, he worked with the Clinton administration to develop the first TV-content ratings . With the Partnership for a Drug Free-America, Mr. Love led a task force that developed anti-drug ads for African-American youth. He is remembered by colleagues at P&G as a mentor for many both inside and outside the company.

Barbara Bacci Mirque, 56

Barbara Bacci Mirque
Barbara Bacci Mirque
A senior VP at the Association of National Advertisers until her untimely death from cancer in March, Barbara Bacci Mirque helped bring to the screen family-friendly shows such as "Gilmore Girls" and "Everybody Hates Chris" as manager of the Family Friendly Programming Forum. Prior to her arrival at the ANA, Ms. Bacci Mirque worked as a product manager and brand marketer at companies including Frito-Lay, Nestlé Foods, Avon, Weight Watchers and Carvel Corp.

Jack Pitney, 47

Jack Pitney
Jack Pitney
Jack Pitney, VP-marketing for BMW North America, was working to make BMW a "warmer, more accessible brand" and give it "some humanity" with its Joy campaign, from GSD&M, when he was killed in a tractor accident in late August. His own humanity and genuine zeal for BMW was on display when he sat down for an interview with Ad Age during last spring's New York International Auto Show. Prior to his role as VP-marketing, Mr. Pitney was VP of Mini, where he was responsible for the brand's reintroduction to the U.S.

Paul Mulcahy, 80

Paul Mulcahy
Paul Mulcahy
Paul N. Mulcahy, a well-known figure in the advertising world who was for many years a high-ranking marketing executive with Campbell Soup Co., was a journalist favorite thanks to his big personality and straight-shooting, quotable lines. Mr. Mulcahy, who was said to have "bled tomato soup," was responsible for creating Labels for Education, which awards educational equipment to schools in exchange for labels from food products.

Jimmy Dean, 81

Jimmy Dean
Jimmy Dean Credit: AP
While most knew him as "The King of Sausage," Jimmy Dean rose to fame after the 1961 release of his country ballad "Big Bad John," which won him a Grammy. He also hosted a variety show on ABC and enjoyed a brief acting career before becoming known as the star of his Jimmy Dean Sausage Co.'s folksy TV campaign. Mr. Dean understood it was honest-to-goodness Southern charm that cemented his legacy: His 2006 memoir was titled "Thirty Years of Sausage, Fifty Years of Ham."

Chet Simmons, 81

Chet Simmons
Chet Simmons
Chester "Chet" Simmons served as president of ESPN during the company's launch in 1979 and helped establish it as the leading brand and media company in sports broadcasting today. But he is perhaps best remembered at ESPN for his role in the creation and development of "Sports Center," which helped influence or launch the careers of commentators such as Jim Simpson, Merlin Olsen and Greg and Bryant Gumbel.

Art Linkletter, 97

Art Linkletter
Art Linkletter Credit: Maxine Picard
TV icon Ark Linkletter made his mark as the host of such golden-age TV programs as "People Are Funny" and "Art Linkletter's House Party," which will be fondly remembered for his "Kids Say the Darndest Things," segment (reprised as a show by Bill Cosby from 1998-2000). Among the products he endorsed were Milton Bradley's The Game of Life, Disneyland's 50th Anniversary in 2005 (he appeared at the park's opening in 1955) and National Home Life insurance.

Gregory Pruitt, 46

Greg Pruitt
Greg Pruitt
Gregory R. Pruitt, managing partner and director for business development at WPP's MediaCom, died in March after experiencing cardiac arrest. Although he'd only been at the company since that past December, in an email to staff, MediaCom USA CEO Doug Checkeris wrote: "He managed in that short time frame to touch many people here at MediaCom with his energy, talent, humor and passion for his work." Prior to MediaCom, Mr. Pruitt founded his own business-development consulting practice, Pruitt & Partners. He also co-founded H20 Films, a branded-content production company that developed award-winning work for Fruit of the Loom, Procter & Gamble's "History of Paper" and for community-service organizations.

Si Kornblit, 76

Si Kornblit
Si Kornblit
Simon "Si" Kornblit was head of worldwide marketing for Universal Pictures until 1993, contributing to the marketing of more than 100 films, including "Jurassic Park," "Scent of a Woman" and "Back to the Future." Prior to that, Mr. Kornblit was general manager of DDB, Los Angeles, after 35 years with the agency in both Los Angeles and New York. A Korean War vet, Mr. Kornblit was born in Antwerp, Belgium, and fled Europe with his family shortly after World War II began.

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