I'm Offering $5,001 for a Next-Gen Lady Gaga or Justin Bieber Prototype

Dumenco's Trendrr Chart of the Week

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It's hard to think of a more perfect Twitter storm than iPhone-gate, given that it involves Apple, the wildly popular gadget blog Gizmodo, and the intrigue surrounding Gizmodo's brief (and possibly illegal?) acquisition of a lost next-generation iPhone. On Monday, New York Times media columnist David Carr helpfully deconstructed the whole controversy, but by the afternoon his piece was suddenly out of date. At 4 p.m., Gizmodo published news about its editor's astonishing legal odyssey, which had actually begun Friday night. The unbylined post, titled "Police Seize Jason Chen's Computers," included a statement by Chen revealing that he came home from dinner to discover that the police had broken the front door of his home open and were in the process of seizing his computers -- apparently to search for possible evidence that Chen and Gizmodo had committed a crime in paying a reported $5,000 for a secret iPhone prototype that an Apple engineer had left behind on a bar stool. Which brings us to this week's Trendrr chart. A few notes and observations:

  • Gizmodo was name-checked 3,503 times during its one-hour peak on April 19, after it posted its exclusive article and photos of the lost iPhone prototype.
  • Gizmodo then smashed its own Twitter record on Monday -- 4,952 tweets name-checked the site during one peak hour.
  • The secret iPhone prototype.
    The secret iPhone prototype. Credit: Gizmodo
  • Apple peaked at 12,727 tweets in one hour on April 21; on Monday it came close to that record with a one-hour peak of 11,010 tweets.
  • The biggest winner in the Twitter buzzfest? Yep, the iPhone itself, which was name-checked 15,063 times during its one-hour peak Monday, April 19. This past Monday's revelation about the police action against Chen set a new iPhone-gate record: 18,073 tweets in one peak hour.

  • I'm going to go out on a limb here and announce that I'm willing to pay $5,001 for a next-gen Lady Gaga or Justin Bieber protoype. (You realize that they're both animatronic, right? Word is that Gaga 2.0 has significantly longer battery life, and Bieber 2.0 has even prettier, silkier hair.) We can say it was "lost," or whatever. Just leave it on a bar stool -- put a big floppy hat on it or something so it doesn't attract attention -- and then e-mail me with the address of the bar, along with an invoice.

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Dumenco's Trendrr Chart of the Week is produced in collaboration with Wiredset, the New York digital agency behind Trendrr, a social- and digital-media tracking service, and Curatorr, a social media filtering and publishing platform. More background here. Trendrr offers a free trial account; Trendrr Pro, which offers more robust tracking and reporting tools, comes in various paid flavors (get the details here).

Simon Dumenco is the "Media Guy" media columnist for Advertising Age. You can follow him on Twitter @simondumenco. The latest Ad Age Insights white paper is titled "Dumenco's State of the Media Report," and subtitled "From social media to search, print, broadcast and beyond, where ad-supported media stands now and where it's going." It's available right here.

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