Fasten Your Chin Straps

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The Giro Atmos helmet, short for atmosphere, will be protecting the dome of Lance Armstrong when he goes for his sixth Tour de France this summer. Whether it will help fly him to victory we don't know, but three new Atmos ads, seen in two-wheel buff books, could do great double duty if the Air Force had a bike division. "What do you do for a product as beautiful as a Giro?" wonders ACD Tony Calcao. "You show the darn helmet and not clutter the imagery with copy about features and specs. The Atmos' name is derived from the idea that the helmet is light as air. The fighter jet references simply come from a rider's desire to go fast. Mark Laita shot the sky views and then projected them onto the helmet in order to get their reflections, before photographing them in a studio."

Client: Giro Agency: Crispin Porter + Bogusky/Miami ECD: Alex Bogusky ACD: Tony Calcao CW: Evan Fry AD: John Parker Photographer: Mark Laita

CP+B has whipped up yet another offbeat marketing idea for Mini, this time with something the agency likes to call "interactive fiction." The "Robots" campaign began with an internet buzz when CP+B released an URL, via techie websites and blogs, to drive traffic to www.r50rd.co.uk/research/internal/v2i/engin. The site contains "information" pertaining to the (completely fictional) eccentric British scientist Colin Mayhew and the top-secret project he was working on, which involved experiments in which parts from Minis were converted into "do-good/superhero" humanoid robots. Small ones, we presume. Interviews, QuickTimes and a detailed history of the experiments performed by Dr. Mayhew, with entries dating back to 1999, really fill out the hoax. Another URL was seeded at paranormal websites and blogs to drive traffic to a site that details the public sightings of the robot in action, http://uk.geocities.com/oxfordsightings. This was followed by the Men of Metal booklet, an alleged excerpt from the book of the same name, which details the "urban legend" around the Mini robots, as well as the search by "author" Rowland Samuel to draw links between the robots, Dr. Mayhew and the stories that led to the legend-the booklet is an insert in April and May issues of the likes of Rolling Stone, Men's Health, Men's Journal and Motor Trend, and it is also being distributed free at select Hudson Newsstands. CP+B claims almost 200,000 unique visitors to the sites in March, during which time Colin Mayhew received over 100 e-mails. At press time, it remained unclear if they would actually be answered.

Client: Mini Agency: Crispin Porter + Bogusky/Miami ECD: Alex Bogusky CD: Andrew Keller AD: Paul Keister, Dave Swartz CWs: Mike Lear, Bob Cianfrone Photographers: Sebastian Gray, Paul Keister Website Illustrator: Rony Kubat Animation: Zoic Studios

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