Ford launches miniseries in Argentina

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[Buenos Aires, Argentina] Ford Motor Co. and its agencies have created a TV miniseries in Argentina to cast Ford's Fiesta as authentic and in-tune with the model's 25-to-35-year-old target, the most competitive market segment.

"In the Line of Fire," Ford's first branded entertainment effort in Argentina, consists of 20 two-minute stories about common things that happen to singles nearing 30. JWT Argentina and MindShare Argentina created and scripted it.

Co-workers Sebastian and Agustina talk with friends about ex-partners, sexual fantasies and what underwear to wear on a first date-each time showing their misunderstanding of the opposite sex. In the first episode, the two stars stay home Friday night. They meet in the elevator at work and lie about plans for dinners and parties, only to climb into their Fiestas to drive home alone to videos and Chinese takeaway. "Whole armies of men and here I am stuffing myself with ice cream," laments Agustina.

Ford opted for the program-part of a 3-year-old campaign with the tagline "How many feelings fit in your car?"-to "talk with its target from a place and with a code that's relevant and novel," said Carolina Bogliano, Ford Argentina's ad manager.

"Line of Fire" airs at midnight on "Duro de Domar" (Hard to Dominate), a popular daily program that takes a comic look at news and celebrities.

Fiesta, helping people connect again with life after work, is "the brand that best understands the problems of this age [and is] most in sync with their values," said Eduardo Parapugna, business director of JWT Argentina.

Online banners link to a site that allows users to read about the stars, watch episodes, post comments and participate in surveys about, for instance, preferences in sexual partners. Fans can print stickers for T-shirts with phrases common with this generation like "I'll call you in the week." Ford even sent journalists ice cream on a Friday.

Target consumers appear keen. One wrote on the site, "at last a vehicle ... that's captured our personality."

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