'BH&G' Publisher Wins 'in an Endearing Way'

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When Michael Brownstein brought Jeannine Shao Collins to Ladies' Home Journal as New York advertising director in 1993, he had no idea that she would be a future publisher of Better Homes & Gardens.

He says he's not surprised that Ms. Collins, 35, now heads the 7.6 million circulation flagship. She is the first woman -- and one of the youngest publishers -- in the Meredith Corp. title's 77-year-old history. A Chinese-American, Ms. Collins is BH&G's first minority publisher.

"She's very focused on winning. And she goes for what she wants in an endearing way," says Mr. Brownstein, publisher of LHJ and More, who calls his former underling "charismatic."

Ms. Collins moved to BH&G as ad director in May 1995. Three years later, she was promoted to associate publisher, and in January 1999 assumed the role of publisher.

Previously, she held ad sales positions at Hachette Filipacchi's Woman's Day -- also under Mr. Brownstein -- and at Rodale's Prevention.

Her meteoric rise through the ranks, says Meredith Publishing Group President Christopher Little, is testament to her dynamic leadership skills and her marketing acumen.

"The reason she earned rapid promotions and the large responsibility that the job entails is because she's smart, hardworking, very high energy and she motivates others to be smarter, more excited and more energetic about the product."

In addition, says Mr. Little, "she understands the brand and gets results."

He says she played a key role in securing Intel Corp. as a primary sponsor of "Blueprint 2000: America's Home for the New Millennium," a multimedia program featuring a high-tech custom house that kicked off last June.

"'Blueprint 2000' was one of our most profitable marketing programs," says Mr. Little, adding the breadth of the brand under her direction has grown to include increases in Web site revenues and BH&G's TV audience.

"Advertisers have gotten the message," says Mr. Little.

Messrs. Brownstein and Little say Ms. Collins' future is bright.

"She is capable of anything," says Mr. Brownstein. "Publishing director, group publisher. She can sell."

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