Peg Masterson

2 MILWAUKEE SHOPS MERGE

05.08.95 @ 12:00 AM EDT

2 MILWAUKEE SHOPS MERGE

05.08.95 @ 12:00 AM EDT

ity in general can benefit newspapers because they're well-known as an effective medium to move cars.'' Ken Stewart, a Midwest zone manager for Oldsmobile in Minneapolis, agrees that the advertising trend is at the local level, with an emphasis on brand and attitude and away from the sale or deal. ``Dealers tend to spend more money on advertising when they are doing well,'' says Doug Dohring, chairman-CEO of the Dohring Co. auto research consultancy. Mr. Dohring says the jury is still out on whether dealership advertising will continue to be strong in 1995, but adds, ``Dealers feel that if their competition is in the paper, they need to be there.'' The electronics and home furnishings retail categories increased 8% and 9%, respectively, from 1993 to 1994 according to CMR, for a combined total of $1.2 billion. Retailers are expected to continue to pursue consumers through heavy use of advertising, mainly in the form of preprint inserts with ROP as a secondary source. ``We're growing and going into more markets every year,'' says Chuck Jacoby, media director for Best Buy Co. The national chain is adding 50 new stores to its 205 stores this year, and Mr. Jacoby says they rely heavily on the use of preprints, utilizing ROP just for new store openings or targeted sales. ``That means [this year] either we'll be in new newspapers or new circulation within an existing newspaper,'' he notes. Mr. Jacoby says that although the increased cost of paper is making preprints more expensive, his company is trying to save money by creating more efficient preprints rather than shift to ROP. CMR reported that financial services advertising grew 26% in 1994, from 1993 to $805 million. Observers see sustained growth in that segment as banks continue to push for more opportunities to serve consumers. U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin continues to push for overhaul of the Banking Act of 1933-which in addition to creating the FDIC, restricts banking practices and separates commericial and investment banking-and that could open up business opportunities. ``If [the act] is modified or repealed, it would blur the lines where banks would be able to get into the brokerage business,'' says Steven Ashley, VP-research at Cleary, Gull, Reiland & McDevitt, a brokerage house.M s-10 Fitzgerald, Cannistraro LOCAL PAPERS LOVE LONG DISTANCE DRUGS ALSO ON PUBLISHERS' GROWTH WISH LIST

04.24.95 @ 12:00 AM EDT

ity in general can benefit newspapers because they're well-known as an effective medium to move cars.'' Ken Stewart, a Midwest zone manager for Oldsmobile in Minneapolis, agrees that the advertising trend is at the local level, with an emphasis on brand and attitude and away from the sale or deal. ``Dealers tend to spend more money on advertising when they are doing well,'' says Doug Dohring, chairman-CEO of the Dohring Co. auto research consultancy. Mr. Dohring says the jury is still out on whether dealership advertising will continue to be strong in 1995, but adds, ``Dealers feel that if their competition is in the paper, they need to be there.'' The electronics and home furnishings retail categories increased 8% and 9%, respectively, from 1993 to 1994 according to CMR, for a combined total of $1.2 billion. Retailers are expected to continue to pursue consumers through heavy use of advertising, mainly in the form of preprint inserts with ROP as a secondary source. ``We're growing and going into more markets every year,'' says Chuck Jacoby, media director for Best Buy Co. The national chain is adding 50 new stores to its 205 stores this year, and Mr. Jacoby says they rely heavily on the use of preprints, utilizing ROP just for new store openings or targeted sales. ``That means [this year] either we'll be in new newspapers or new circulation within an existing newspaper,'' he notes. Mr. Jacoby says that although the increased cost of paper is making preprints more expensive, his company is trying to save money by creating more efficient preprints rather than shift to ROP. CMR reported that financial services advertising grew 26% in 1994, from 1993 to $805 million. Observers see sustained growth in that segment as banks continue to push for more opportunities to serve consumers. U.S. Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin continues to push for overhaul of the Banking Act of 1933-which in addition to creating the FDIC, restricts banking practices and separates commericial and investment banking-and that could open up business opportunities. ``If [the act] is modified or repealed, it would blur the lines where banks would be able to get into the brokerage business,'' says Steven Ashley, VP-research at Cleary, Gull, Reiland & McDevitt, a brokerage house.M s-10 Fitzgerald, Cannistraro LOCAL PAPERS LOVE LONG DISTANCE DRUGS ALSO ON PUBLISHERS' GROWTH WISH LIST

04.24.95 @ 12:00 AM EDT

Malts by mail Here's a list, from largest to smallest, of the beer-of -the-month clubs (chart) MAIL-ORDER BEER CLUBS QUENCH UNIQUE THIRST

09.19.94 @ 12:00 AM EDT

MILKING LABELS FOR ALL THEY'RE WORTH

09.05.94 @ 12:00 AM EDT

MILKING LABELS FOR ALL THEY'RE WORTH

09.05.94 @ 12:00 AM EDT

MORTEN SAEDBERG KING OSCAR

07.04.94 @ 12:00 AM EDT

DAVID RICHARDS LENSCRAFTERS

07.04.94 @ 12:00 AM EDT

TARGETED DISCOUNTS SCRAP PAPER COUPONS

06.13.94 @ 12:00 AM EDT

GRAFFITI FIGHTERS ERASE NEON'S `HI' AD BOARDS

05.16.94 @ 12:00 AM EDT

BOTTLED WATER MAKES WAVES ABOUT PARASITE PROBLEM IN WISCONSIN

05.02.94 @ 12:00 AM EDT

DAIRY STATE MILK DRINKERS GORE HORMONE

04.18.94 @ 12:00 AM EDT

Maz Blackston Research International BRANDS SEEK SUBCONSCIOUS BOOST

03.14.94 @ 12:00 AM EST