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Doritos - Doritos Dogs

February 07, 2016 | :30

Doritos' 10th and final "Crash the Super Bowl" ad contest yielded two spots that participants in USA Today's annual ad meter loved, as usual: "Doritos Dogs," the winner of Doritos' online voting, ranked fourth on the Ad Meter, and "Ultrasound" ranked third.

The contest, introduced in 2006 for the 2007 game and long assisted by Goodby Silverstein & Partners, made sight gags and pet tricks even more a staple of Super Bowl advertising than they already were. That's not only because those executions frequently won the voting to choose which ads actually got Super Bowl time, but because "Crash" ads often ranked in the top 10 of USA Today's Ad Meter, a feat to which many marketers aspire. (The blowup between CareerBuilder.com and Cramer-Krasselt in 2007 was an extreme example of what can happen when ads miss that mark; see "Performance Review" for more.)

Frito-Lay North America Chief Marketing Officer Ram Krishnan credited "Crash" for helping grow Doritos to a $2.2 billion U.S. brand on the eve of Super Bowl 50 from a $1.54 billion brand in 2006. "It's not a one-and-done deal on the game day," said Krishnan. "It's basically this five-to six-month engagement program that we had with the consumer." Ad-scoring firm Ace Metrix ranks Doritos No. 1 on its list of the most effective Super-Bowl advertised brands from 2010 through 2015.

So why stop? "Crash" began when YouTube was in its infancy, Twitter was barely known and the iPhone didn't exist. Doritos was providing a "stage for the consumers to shine," Krishnan said; young people by 2016 were no longer "waiting to be discovered." 

"Doritos Dogs" was conceived by Jacob Chase, 29, who won $1 million along with his Super Bowl slot. “I’ll probably be responsible at first and pay off my student loans which would be awesome, but then I’d love to continue to try to make my dreams come true and put that toward making a movie or something,” he told ABC.

Director/writer: Jacob Chase. Producer/writer: Travis Braun. Director of photography: Danny Grunes. Production designer: Dylan Stein. First assistant director: Keith Schwalenberg. Casting director: Derek Stusynski. Hair/make-up: Melissa Morales. Costume designer: Elissa Alcala. Trench coat fabricator: Maxine Chase. Art Assistant: Quinn Banford. VFX: Drew Mylrea. Colorist: Peter Swartz. Sound: James Wasserman. Post sound mixer: Shawn Duffy. Graphics: Annie Tsai.

Send credit info to SuperBowlAdArchive@adage.com.
  • BrandDoritos
  • Year2016
  • AgencyGoodby, Silverstein & Partners
  • Superbowl #50
  • Quarter airedQ3